Book Group Take-Out

Thinking of starting a book group? Does your established book group need a little help? If so, Book Group Take-Out was designed with you in mind. Each Book Group Take-Out kit contains 10-12 copies of the book and a discussion guide that includes:

  • tips for running a book discussion
  • background information on the author
  • a summary of the book
  • discussion questions

Book Group Take-Out kits can be checked out for a period of eight weeks. Renewals are not allowed and you are limited to two kits checked-out at one time. There is no charge to check out Book Group Take-Out kits, but if they are returned late, incomplete or damaged, fines and fees will apply.

Book Group Take-Out is sponsored by the Friends of the Library groups.

The following titles are available as Book Group Take-Out kits:

  • 13 Hours
    by Mitchell Zuckoff

    The first account of the events of September 11, 2012, when terrorists attacked the U.S. State Department Special Mission Compound and a nearby CIA station called the Annex in Benghazi, Libya. A team of six American security operators fought to repel the attackers and protect the Americans stationed there. Those men went beyond the call of duty, performing extraordinary acts of courage and heroism, to avert tragedy on a much larger scale. This is their personal account of the thirteen hoursof that now-infamous attack, setting the record straight on what happened during a night that has been shrouded in controversy.

  • One Hundred Years of Solitude
    by Gabriel García Márquez

    One of the most influential literary works of our time, One Hundred Years of Solitude is a dazzling and original achievement by the masterful Gabriel Garcia Marquez, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature. One Hundred Years of Solitude tells the story of the rise and fall, birth and death of the mythical town of Macondo through the history of the Buendia family.

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  • The Alchemist
    by Paulo Coelho

    Paulo Coelho's enchanting novel has inspired a devoted following around the world, and this tenth anniversary edition, with a new introduction from the author, will only increase that following. This story, dazzling in its powerful simplicity and inspiring wisdom, is about an Andalusian shepherd boy named Santiago who travels from his homeland in Spain to the Egyptian desert in search of a treasure buried in the Pyramids. 

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  • Americanah
    by Chimananda Ngozi Adichie

    A powerful, tender story of race and identity by the award-winning author of Half of a Yellow Sun . Ifemelu and Obinze are young and in love when they depart military-ruled Nigeria for the West. Beautiful, self-assured Ifemelu heads for America, where despite her academic success, she is forced to grapple with what it means to be black for the first time. Quiet, thoughtful Obinze had hoped to join her, but with post-9/11 America closed to him, he instead plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London. Fifteen years later, they reunite in a newly democratic Nigeria, and reignite their passion--for each other and for their homeland.

  • Arc of Justice
    by Kevin Boyle

    An electrifying story of the sensational murder trial that divided a city and ignited the civil rights struggle. In 1925, Detroit was a smoky swirl of jazz and speakeasies, assembly lines and fistfights. The advent of automobiles had brought workers from around the globe to compete for manufacturing jobs, and tensions often flared with the KKK in ascendance and violence rising. Arc of Justice is the winner of the 2004 National Book Award for Nonfiction.

  • Balm
    by Dolen Perkins-Valdez

    Set during the [era after the] Civil War and exploring the next chapter of history--the end of slavery--this story of love and healing is about three people who struggle to overcome the pain of the past and define their own future.

  • The Bluest Eye
    by Toni Morrison

    Pecola Breedlove, a young black girl, prays every day for beauty. Mocked by other children for the dark skin, curly hair, and brown eyes that set her apart, she yearns for normalcy, for the blond hair and blue eyes that she believes will allow her to finally fit in.Yet as her dream grows more fervent, her life slowly starts to disintegrate in the face of adversity and strife.

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  • The Book Thief
    by Markus Zusak

    The extraordinary #1 New York Times bestseller that is now a major motion picture, Markus Zusak's unforgettable story is about the ability of books to feed the soul. It is 1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier, and will become busier still. Liesel Meminger is a foster girl living outside of Munich, who scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can't resist-books.

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  • The Boys in the Boat
    by Daniel James Brown

    The improbable, intimate account of how nine working-class boys from the American West showed the world at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin what true grit really meant. It was an unlikely quest from the start. With a team composed of the sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the University of Washington's eight-oar crew team was never expected to defeat the elite teams of the East Coast and Great Britain, yet they did, going on to shock the world by defeating the German team rowing for Adolf Hitler.

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  • The Color Purple
    by Alice Walker

    The Pulitzer Prize-winning novel that tells the story of two sisters through their correspondence. With a new Preface by the author.

  • The Devil in the White City
    by Erik Larson

    Erik Larson--author of #1 bestseller IN THE GARDEN OF BEASTS--intertwines the true tale of the 1893 World's Fair and the cunning serial killer who used the fair to lure his victims to their death. Combining meticulous research with nail-biting storytelling, Erik Larson has crafted a narrative with all the wonder of newly discovered history and the thrills of the best fiction.

  • Eat, pray, love
    by Elizabeth Gilbert

    A celebrated writer pens an irresistible, candid, and eloquent account of her pursuit of worldly pleasure, spiritual devotion, and what she really wanted out of life.

  • Everything I Never Told You
    by Celeste Ng

     "Lydia is dead. But they don't know this yet." So begins this exquisite novel about a Chinese American family living in 1970s small-town Ohio. Lydia is the favorite child of Marilyn and James Lee, and her parents are determined that she will fulfill the dreams they were unable to pursue. But when Lydia's body is found in the local lake, the delicate balancing act that has been keeping the Lee family together is destroyed, tumbling them into chaos.

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  • The Eyre Affair
    by Jasper Fforde

    Welcome to a surreal version of Great Britain, circa 1985, where time travel is routine, cloning is a reality (dodos are the resurrected pet of choice), and literature is taken very, very seriously. England is a virtual police state where an aunt can get lost (literally) in a Wordsworth poem, militant Baconians heckle performances of Hamlet, and forging Byronic verse is a punishable offense.

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  • Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe
    by Fannie Flagg

    Folksy and fresh, endearing and affecting, Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe is thenow-classic novel of two women in the 1980s; of gray-headed Mrs. Threadgoode telling her life story to Evelyn, who is in the sad slump of middle age.

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  • Girl with a Pearl Earring
    by Tracy Chevalier

    The New York Times bestselling novel by the author of Remarkable Creatures and The Last Runaway Translated into thirty-nine languages and made into an Oscar-nominated film, starring Scarlett Johanson and Colin Firth Tracy Chevalier transports readers to a bygone time and place in this richly-imagined portrait of the young woman who inspired one of Vermeer's most celebrated paintings. History and fiction merge seamlessly in this luminous novel about artistic vision and sensual awakening.

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  • God Help the Child
    by Toni Morrison

    Spare and unsparing, God Help the Child--the first novel by Toni Morrison to be set in our current moment--weaves a tale about the way the sufferings of childhood can shape, and misshape, the life of the adult. At the center: a young woman who calls herself Bride, whose stunning blue-black skin is only one element of her beauty, her boldness and confidence, her success in life, but which caused her light-skinned mother to deny her even the simplest forms of love.

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  • The Goldfinch
    by Donna Tartt

    A young boy in New York City, Theo Decker, miraculously survives an accident that takes the life of his mother. Alone and abandoned by his father, Theo is taken in by a friend's family and struggles to make sense of his new life. In the years that follow, he becomes entranced by one of the few things that reminds him of his mother: a small, mysteriously captivating painting that ultimately draws Theo into the art underworld.

  • Good Omens
    by Neil Gaiman

    The world will end on Saturday. Next Saturday. Just before dinner, according to The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch, the world's only completely accurate book of prophecies written in 1655. The armies of Good and Evil are amassing and everything appears to be going according to Divine Plan.

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  • Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet
    by Jamie Ford

    "Sentimental, heartfelt....the exploration of Henry's changing relationship with his family and with Keiko will keep most readers turning pages...A timely debut that not only reminds readers of a shameful episode in American history, but cautions us to examine the present and take heed we don't repeat those injustices."--Kirkus Reviews

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  • The Human Stain
    by Philip Roth

    It is 1998, the year in which America is whipped into a frenzy of prurience by the impeachment of a president, and in a small New England town, an aging classics professor, Coleman Silk, is forced to retire when his colleagues decree that he is a racist. The charge is a lie, but the real truth about Silk would have astonished even his most virulent accuser.

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  • The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
    by Rebecca Skloot

    Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer, yet her cells--taken without her knowledge--became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first "immortal" human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years.

  • The Invention of Wings
    by Sue Monk Kidd

    From the celebrated author of The Secret Life of Bees , a #1 New York Times bestselling novel about two unforgettable American women. Hetty "Handful" Grimke, an urban slave in early nineteenth century Charleston, yearns for life beyond the suffocating walls that enclose her within the wealthy Grimke household. The Grimke's daughter, Sarah, has known from an early age she is meant to do something large in the world, but she is hemmed in by the limits imposed on women.

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  • Kindred
    by Octavia E. Butler

    Dana, a modern black woman, is celebrating her twenty-sixth birthday with her new husband when she is snatched abruptly from her home in California and transported to the antebellum South. Rufus, the white son of a plantation owner, is drowning, and Dana has been summoned to save him.

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  • The Kite Runner
    by Khaled Hosseini

    An epic tale of fathers and sons, of friendship and betrayal, that takes us from Afghanistan in the final days of the monarchy to the atrocities of the present. The unforgettable, heartbreaking story of the unlikely friendship between a wealthy boy and the son of his father's servant, The Kite Runner is a beautifully crafted novel set in a country that is in the process of being destroyed.

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  • The Knitting Circle
    by Ann Hood

    In the spirit of How to Make an American Quilt and The Joy Luck Club, this is a novel about friendship and redemption. After the sudden loss of her only child, Stella, Mary Baxter joins a knitting circle in Providence, Rhode Island, as a way to fill the empty hours and lonely days, not knowing that it will change her life.

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  • Me Before You
    by JoJo Moyes

    Louisa Clark is an ordinary girl living an exceedingly ordinary life--steady boyfriend, close family--who has barely been farther afield than their tiny village. She takes a badly needed job working for ex-Master of the Universe Will Traynor, who is wheelchair bound after an accident.

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  • The Old Man and the Sea
    by Ernest Hemingway

    The Old Man and the Sea is one of Hemingway's most enduring works. Told in language of great simplicity and power, it is the story of an old Cuban fisherman, down on his luck, and his supreme ordeal-a relentless, agonizing battle with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream.

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  • Peace Like a River
    by Leif Enger

    Eleven-year-old asthmatic Reuben Land chronicles the Land family's odyssey in search of Reuben's older brother, Davy, who has escaped from jail before he can stand trial for the killing of two marauders who came to their Minnesota farm to harm the family. A first novel.

  • A Piece of Cake
    by Cupcake Brown

    The bestselling memoir of Cupcake Brown's harrowing and inspiring life from the streets to one of the nation's largest law firms dazzles you with the amazing change that is possible in one lifetime. ("Washington Post Book World").

  • The Red Tent
    by Anita Diamant

    Based on the Book of Genesis, Dinah, Jacob's only daughter, shares her perspectives on the origins of many of our modern religious practices and sexual politics, imparting the lessons she has learned from her father's wives.

  • Run with the Horsemen
    by Ferrol Sams

    A boy's account of growing up in the South during the depression era. Both a rare first novel and a new American classic, Sams novel has been compared to Tom Sawyer and To Kill a Mockingbird.

  • Sarah's Key
    by Tatiana de Rosnay

    A New York Times bestseller. Paris, July 1942: Sarah, a ten-year-old girl, is brutally arrested with her family by the French police in the Vel' d'Hiv' roundup, but not before she locks her younger brother in a cupboard in the family's apartment, thinking that she will be back within a few hours.

  • The Secret Keeper
    by Kate Morton

    Sixteen-year-old Laurel Nicolson witnesss a shocking crime that challenges everything she knows about her family and especially her mother, Dorothy. Now, fifty years later, Laurel is a successful and well-regarded actress, living in London. She returns to the family farm for Dorothy's ninetieth birthday and finds herself overwhelmed by questions she has not thought about for decades.

  • The Sellout
    by Paul Beatty

    A biting satire about a young man's isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court.

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  • The Stranger
    by Albert Camus

    A young Algerian, Meursault, afflicted with a sort of aimless inertia, becomes embroiled in the petty intrigues of a local pimp and, somewhat inexplicably, ends up killing a man. Once he's imprisoned and eventually brought to trial, his crime, it becomes apparent, is not so much the arguably defensible murder he has committed as it is his deficient character.

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  • Things Fall Apart
    by Chinua Achebe

    Okonkwo, the leader of an Igbo (Ibo) community is banished for accidentally killing a clansman. His story covers the seven years of his exile, providing an inside view of the intrusion of white missionaries and colonial government into tribal Igbo society in the 1890s.

  • The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry
    by Rachel Joyce

    Harold Fry is convinced that he must deliver a letter to an old love in order to save her, meeting various characters along the way and reminiscing about the events of his past and people he has known, as he tries to find peace and acceptance.

  • What Lookls LIke Crazy on an Ordinary Day
    by Pearl Cleage

    In a remarkable debut novel that sizzles with sensuality, crackles with life-affirming energy and moves the reader to laughter and tears, author Pearl Cleage creates a world rich in character, human drama, and deep, compassionate understanding.

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  • Where'd You Go, Bernadette
    by Maria Semple

    Bernadette Fox is notorious. To her Microsoft-guru husband, she's a fearlessly opinionated partner; to fellow private-school mothers in Seattle, she's a disgrace; to design mavens, she's a revolutionary architect, and to 15-year-old Bee, she is a best friend and, simply, Mom. Then Bernadette disappears.

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  • The White Tiger
    by Aravind Adiga

    Balram Halwai is a complicated man. Servant. Philosopher. Entrepreneur. Murderer. Over the course of seven nights, by the scattered light of a preposterous chandelier, Balram tells the terrible and transfixing story of how he came to be a success in life--having nothing but his own wits to help him along.